BJDs

Getting Naked - baring it all behind the scenes

by Sharon Wright

Cat Hammond, over at The Doll Affinity, wrote a really fantastic post in response to my article about 12 Tips To Being a Better Photo Blogger.  In it, she talks about wanting to be more candid and pulling back the curtain a little to show some of the magic in the process of this hobby we love - photography. It really connected with me. I love watching behind the scenes videos and seeing other peoples' BTS photoshoots and whatnot - but I really haven't shared any of my own.

Since Cat sort of challenged others to do it, I thought I would kick it off and strip down to my bare bones. You'll see that I am not a perfect photographer, that most of the 'magic' actually happens in the editing room. 

To start off with, I shoot on a Canon T3i. It's not a super fancy camera, more of an older (discontinued) lower end pro-sumer style DSLR. I have a few different lenses but my lens of choice is my nifty fifty, 50mm. I shoot in full manual mode and usually manual focus as well. I prefer to shoot in RAW as that gives me the greatest flexibility to fix all my mistakes ;) I work in Adobe products for post processing. 

Now, I need to say this because it comes up all the time. It is not the camera that takes great pictures. Yes, it helps, but it is the skill and eye of the photographer and editor that makes it amazing. There are some pretty freaking jaw dropping images I've seen that were shot on a cellphone camera - so there are zero excuses. All the tools are available on the internet for you to learn any skill you want. That is how I taught myself. 

For this challenge, I tried to select a few different things to give you just a simple quick peek at my before & afters.  

Anyway - here goes... 

Brazen Beauty Natalia Fatalé - one of my all time favorite Integrity Toys ladies. She is from the 2013 convention (my first, and favorite, convention of theirs)
Dress by Ursi Sarna

Underexposed. She was shot deep in the shadows and since I didn't want to drop my shutter speed lower (to avoid blurriness from camera shake) I chose to take the darker shot at a faster shutter speed to get a crisper shot.  I knew, since I shoot in RAW, that I would have the ability to easily adjust the colors and contrast in post processing. I could have adjusted my ISO but I was, honestly, just being lazy. I fixed a few crazy hairs and added a bit more sun haze coming from the left side of the shot. 

Intrigue Elise Jolie by Integrity Toys, from the 2014 convention
Dress by Ginny Liezert

Same shoot, same day. This time I overexposed. Not on purpose. I snap a few shots as I'm making my adjustments in the camera. Sometimes the first couple pics end up being good and I want to save them, Again, since I shoot in RAW, I was able to fully adjust and play with the lighting in post. You'll notice that I also fixed a couple stray hairs and the gap in the petals on the dress too.

This shoot is one I did for Mombie & Son (Bo Bergemann and her son). It was an entire series of about 40 amazing, cinematic style images promoting their zombie bjds they featured at the 2015 SDCC. (Seriously, it's pretty damned cool. You can check the shots out HERE)

As you can tell I photoshopped some lights onto the vehicle to add a bit more realism to the 'moment' that was captured. I also adjusted the color levels to get a more creepy/greenish/horror feel to it and a bit more haze to give it a bit more 'tooth'. This was shot during the later half of golden hour and the effect of the sunlight in the hair and the movement in the dolls just really made these shots work so beautifully in creating that "movie moment" I was going for.
Without a doubt - one of the funnest and most creative shoots I've ever done!

Ginny, by Linda Macario. Coming very soon to JpopDolls

This one was really fun. Most people know me for being a mostly outdoor, natural light photographer. I don't do a whole lot of indoor diorama shoots - not that I don't enjoy them - I'm just not great at lighting them or working with flash effectively - but I'm trying to learn.  
I bought this fantastic bed set on Etsy from One Sixth Avenue, originally to use for my Naked Trooper series (absolutely NSFW). However, when I put glasses on Ginny she instantly came to life with this fantastic geekness to her and I knew she would have a bed set like that - and, like all teens, she'd have a really messy room.  
I got two really awesome paper lanterns (that actually lit up) in my 70's themed One Sixth Box a couple months ago and I had a desk lamp from the Dollar Tree that lit up. I used a few LED lamps placed just under the "TV" to give the effect that she was watching something and then placed a small lamp just to the right of the room on the other side of a velum paper window to give the illusion of maybe a street lamp or house light at night.
As you can tell, I did not adjust my white balance well so the original shot is very yellowish. No problem, I can easily adjust the colors when I bring the image in. I enhanced the lights to give them a bit more glow, adjusted shadows and selectively increased the exposure in some areas.
There are a lot of things I wish I still knew how to do better, but over all I'm pleased with how it turned out.

I never really put a lot of thought into showing my process, but after reading Cat's post I realized that I too love seeing the nakedness of other peoples work - so why not bare my own.

I will try to do posts showing my process more. And, if I don't - remind me and I'll make sure to get it done ;)

Oh - and for real - check out The Doll Affinity. Her 1:6 mini-me Cat is the best ever, and she does a dynamic job putting together some truly creative photo stories. 

We'd love to see your shots as well. Are you daring enough to get naked in front of your peers? Post them on our Facebook page under this link. 

To see more of my crap - a.k.a. - the stuff I do when I'm not working on STAND...
Facebook
Instagram
Flickr
All the NSFW stuff ;) 

12 Tips to Being a Better Photo Blogger

12 Tips to Being a Better Photo Blogger

Photo blogger and STAND editor-in-chief, Sharon Wright, lines out 12 keys to success 

Read More

This Super Amazing Handy Dandy Scale Converter Will Save Your Sanity!

If you hate to math - like me - then this will change everything!

I was trying to make a newspaper today as a prop for a shot I'm working on and wanted to scale it down to 1:6 size. Well, I'm HORRIBLE at math, seriously, I can't math at all. That is when I stumbled upon this little gem...

SCALE CONVERSION CALCULATOR

If you ever want to scale something up or down - this will save you time and headaches!!!

Check it out and bookmark it for future use!

The Value of Integrity - Tips From One Artist to Another

by Tracy Promber
Facebook Group
JPopDolls

 

With so many new, and talented artists coming out, I thought I would pass along some useful tips that were once offered to me when i entered the world of dolls. Maybe this will be helpful to some, maybe not. You can love it or leave it. It's up to you, but it's worked for me.

Be an ORIGINAL. With copyright and recasting issues rearing its ugly head more and more, don't be the person who gets accused of copying another artists work. That is a big unwritten no-no. While there is only so many ways you can re-invent the wheel, don't blatantly "emulate" another's work for resale. It's just flat out wrong.

No, it's not flattering to see something that took you a very long time to design, and put together, remade by someone else a week after you put your work out for the world to see. Be it sculpting, painting, sewing, etc, things inevitably can end up similar to someone else's work but, please, put your own spin on things. Make your work unique to you. Be an individual who shines on their own. I promise you, you will be admired that much more for it, plus it just feels good being able to create something that came from your heart. Not to mention that you may find yourself infringing on copyright, which can carry some stiff penalties.  And on that note, get your work registered with the copyright office too.

Be SUPPORTIVE. I am very fortunate to have a close group of friends in the doll world. They are a second family to me. We always support each other, whether it is personal or work related, I know without a doubt they will be there. Being able to run ideas past each other, or gather input on current works in progress is fantastic! It's just nice to share with them, and have that sounding board of feedback when needed whether it's good or bad. We all in this industry should support new artists and help guide them to be great. There is so much talent out there that should be nurtured instead of put down out of jealousy.

Dedication. The doll world is such a large and diverse area. There is a lot of room to spread your creative wings so to speak. Don't be afraid to try new things. Put your self out there. Challenge yourself with new projects. Most importantly, don't give up! Stay focused on your goals. Sometimes walking away from a tough project for a few days does the trick for me.  Especially when starting again with fresh eyes. If at first you don't succeed, try it another way. Some of my best creations were trial and error over and over, until I got it right. I've also had many a project make its way into the trash bin too. Don't get frustrated. We all have "those" projects. Just don't quit.

Stay humble and be thankful for the opportunities that come your way. Don't complain. Especially online. If things don't go your way, try again. Your day will come. People get turned off by excessive whining. We all have our own struggles, and sooner or later they always work out.  Be conscious of what you post online.  What is aggravating today and led you to a big Facebook ranting, will probably not seem like that big of a deal tomorrow, making you regret having posted it in the first place. The doll world is not the place to try to gain a sale out of sympathy or anger. If people like what you create, they will seek it. Don't guilt people into buying your stuff.

Being recognized for your accomplishments. Again, be humble and thankful. I've been fortunate enough to win numerous awards for my work. The awards that mean the most to me are the ones that my customers and peers voted towards. It is very gratifying to know that my work has touched people the way the Iintended it to. If it gives someone joy, it's all worth it to me. This is why I do it. Having the ability to create is definitely a blessing, and I am thankful for it every day.  Having been given a GENUINE award is a phenomenal feeling. Always remember this is a business. One award does not a master make though. Keep up the good work. Keep building and honing your skill. It all will pay off in the end.

 

Integrity is really everything, and it's an easy thing to have and maintain. Just remember:

Don't get caught up in drama.
Stay focused on your originality.
Keep your head screwed on straight.
Keep your moral compass in check. 
Stay honest and humble.
Don't be afraid to explore new ideas.
Don't step on other artists toes
Do ask for help when you need it.

The doll world should be a fun and exciting place. Let's all do our part to keep it that way

This is all advice that has been gathered and taken to heart over the years. No one is perfect or exempt from screwing up. We all do it. Everyone is expected to make mistakes here and there. That's how we learn right?

Collectible, OOAK, or Artist Dolls - oh my! Award Confusion Abounds

I have been looking at the Public Choice awards/Dolls Awards of Excellence Awards that DOLLS magazine does.  I have to admit this confuses the heck out of me. It actually always has but when I was working for them (Jones Publishing) I didn't want to admit I was a complete idiot when it came to the wide world of dolls. 

But, now I am.

For the awards, there are Collectible Doll categories, Artist Doll categories and OOAK doll categories. (There are also faceup, fashion, baby dolls and reborns.) 

The Artist dolls are all ball jointed dolls, I am guessing they are all one-offs of various existing/upcoming dolls done by the artist, right? That is what it looks like. That one is fairly easy.

The OOAK category is where it gets really confusing. dolls are all over the board in that category. The OOAK Fantasy Themed dolls are all figures. The OOAK Less than $1250 and Over $1250 are all figures except for one bjd and a baby doll. Were those mistaken placements? I guess not, since one (or more) was an Award of Excellence winner in that category.
(note - I'm not discounting the winners, stay with me here...)

Looking at the entries, some of the Artist Dolls are also OOAK so I'm not sure what the distinction is between an artist doll and a OOAK.

THEN, if it's not confusing enough, there is the Collectible Doll categories. Okay wait...aren't they all collectible?  

It's kind of all over the board, some of them are OOAK and some were pre-orders...and one is a statue. And wouldn't most of these fit into the other categories, or vice versa, so why the different category? And what is the difference between an Artist doll and a Collectible doll? 

AAAAGGGGHHHH!!!!!!!

Seriously. Do you see my conundrum? How do you even judge this? 

I always thought what classified something as a doll was that it was poseable in some way. The head turns, the arms move, etc. I understand many dolls are mainly for display, but they are still meant to be interactive in some fashion.

Then there are figures. We have collected quite a few of them. A 'figure/figurine/statue' is created in a particular pose and, many times, affixed to a base. It is not meant to be played with, modified, or even redressed. Really, it's only purpose is to be looked at.  

Then - you come to art dolls - which, apparently, which don't have to conform to a damn thing, which is where a lot of the confusion all comes from, Is it a doll or a figure? WTF?!?! And why does it get to be whatever the hell it wants? 

Confused yet? 

Shouldn't there just be a figure/art doll category? Because, really, it's a nightmare to even try to judge this. How do you compare an engineered, functional bjd next to a filmmaker Santa figure? Or a Don Quijote figure with a baby doll. Was the baby sculpted? or from a kit? Because that would make a big difference, right? Do you get what I'm saying? 

Now, don't get me wrong, I greatly appreciate the talent and skill it takes to create all of these, and they are all wonderful. That part is not up for debate. I'm only bringing up the category choices because it's confusing as hell and I wonder if it is as confusing to everyone else.

With all that being said - I highly encourage everyone to go check it all out and cast your vote. Support the artists that work so hard to create the treasures we love. You'll find all the info in the latest issue of DOLLS mag and Haute Doll mag - they were both the same issue this time.

Leave your thoughts, I am genuinely interested. 

When the standard just doesn't fit - you break it. Pasha Setrova is changing the jointing game

Pasha Setrova is a Russian born artist, currently living in New York, who's work has been seen on MTV, Bazaar, Cosmopolitan, Tatler, Fashion Collection, Time Out, Grazia, InStyle, Hello!, Fashion Report, Fashion Collection, OK!, Moscow Where, L’Etoile, Profashion, L’Officiel, People, Russian Chicago, WTF?, Snob, Tape, and many others.

Her sculptures are amazingly full of wonderment. I am a tremendous fan of her art! Trust me, just take a look at her site and see it all - just wow.

Westwood - Choose Well

Saintly Sinners

Lollipop Art

Dirty Whisper

So, when I see that she is creating a doll - well - STOP EVERYTHING AND LOOK!  

I'm not the traditional collector, dolls are mostly the muses for my photography, so obviously I am a big lover of all things jointed, the more jointed the better as it means more natural posing abilities. 

As I was falling down the rabbit hole online one night, I saw it. The first thing I noticed was the shoulders. I literally think my jaw dropped. 

Now, I'll admit my knowledge of bjds is fairly small compared to the totality of the world out there. There are a gazillion artists creating a wide array of styles but I, personally, have yet to see one with jointed shoulders. 

I had to talk to her and find out more! 

S: I had to reach out to you and find out more about this doll you are creating. Tell me more. Is this your first doll? 

P: I had it in my head to make a ball jointed doll for a long time already but from the beginning I wanted her to be unique - different from all others and very articulated.
About a year ago I finally decided to start my long awaited project and prepared for a lengthy process. I've been a figurative sculpture for some time now, but I hadn't had any experience with ball joint dolls before. To be honest, I hadn't even held one before! But since I wanted to make her different I tried to think about my lack of experience as an advantage. Things standardly seen in the industry like immobile set shoulders and square elbows/knees were not engrained in my mind.
And so I built her from the joints up – in particular the shoulder joints. As a former model I know most poses, if they are not static, involve the shoulders and I knew that if I could just create shoulder joints that could properly mirror those motions, my doll would already be unique. Because as of yet, I have not seen any other ball jointed doll with naturally articulating shoulders - that not only move up, but also forward. While it may seem very simple but to come up with these simple looking shoulders, I went through 5 drastically different prototypes. And when I finally did find the shape I was looking for, it was just the beginning of a dozen more prints with a dozen more adjustments.
I am also proud of the knees and elbows. Most bjd dolls have these square knees and elbows when fully bent . I strove to keep mine natural looking not only when they were straightened but also when bent. I worked everyday for the past year and eventually I think I went through about 57 different bodies. Maybe more.
S: I believe it. I am just in love with her already! So, what are the next steps for you and your doll?
P: I am finally so close to finishing her. A couple of last minute adjustments left before I will send her off to a mold maker to be casted and then she will debut on a moderately exclusive scale. So here I am and here's my new PashaPasha doll. She's not a toy and yet she is a toy. You can play with her, change her wigs, her eyes, her clothes. You can pose her and just admire her. She can make the most perfect poses. She is perfect to me.

To connect with Pasha
Facebook
Instagram
Website

EXCLUSIVE Tutorial by UNNIEdolls

UNNIEdolls gives us the first look at her newest tutorial. An adorable off shoulder blouse with easy to follow directions. ENJOY!

I created this pattern maybe a year ago. Many of you have been interested how I make the off shoulder blouses for my dolls. So, here is a tutorial, where I show you the whole process. If you make a blouse by using my pattern, please share with me on facebook, instagram, flickr, deviantart by using this hashtag #sewingwithunnie

HUNGARIAN SUBTITLE is available!

if you have any questions, please ask!:)

♥ Webpage/blog/shop: http://unniedolls.com
♥ Etsy Shop: http://unniedolls.etsy.com

My social sites:
♥ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/unniedolls
♥ Google+: https://plus.google.com/+unniedolls1
♥ VK: http://vk.com/unniedolls

♥ Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/UNNiEDOLLS
♥ Tumblr: http://unniedolls.tumblr.com
 

The Editors Shoot - Ginny by Linda Macario

Man, This is when I love my job the most, when I get a chance to play with something brand new! I adore my collection but the thrill of taking a new doll out of the box and discovering it's 'voice' is what drives my creative juices. And, when it's a doll that isn't quite available to the public yet - well it makes it just that much more special. 

Ginny, by Linda Macario, stands 17.7 inches and is coming very soon to Jpopdolls.net

I shot her in various wigs and styles but you can really tell when I fell in love with her. As soon as I popped that gorgeous shoulder length straight red on her it was instantaneous. She really sprang to life and I became quite inspired as her personality began to develop. She is adorable in frills and bows but, for me, I love her with a slightly geeky style.

Visit Jpopdolls.net to learn more about Ginny. (I should also mention that all the wigs are from Jpop too - they do some seriously fantastic wigs!!!) 

For those who like cute girls with wires sticking out of them - Smart Doll to the rescue

Danny Choo turned heads last year when he introduced his line of Smart Dolls, first modeled off the mascot of Culture Japan, Mirai Suenaga.

These dolls fuse Japanese ball-jointed craftsmanship with useful functions like the ability to hold game controllers and other objects up to 700 grams (about 1.5 pounds), to tell time, and, now with his latest addition to the series, She can do even more.

Whether it's charging your mobile accessories, connecting an external hard drive, maybe even hold an external web cam, she can do it all with a built-in USB hub. 

 For folks who face first world problems like the USB sockets being on the backside of an iMac, you can now easily gain access to USB ports via Smart Doll USB Hub

For folks who face first world problems like the USB sockets being on the backside of an iMac, you can now easily gain access to USB ports via Smart Doll USB Hub

The female torso option has two conveniently located USB slots for all your gadgets.

But for those of you concerned that Choo has literally objectified the female physique, don’t worry- there’s also a male version that comes with a nice six-pack and an extra slot

▼ I guess even in doll form, boobs still get in the way

The USB is situated inside the doll with a soft foam protection, but it can be easily removed or replaced with other things. Just take her top off (again, literally) and pop it back on.

At a 14,000 yen (US$130) for a torso piece (other body parts sold separately), it might be a little difficult to collect them all, but just imagine the hours of fun you could have if you did!

Of course, a few people, and maybe some of our readers, may be disappointed that Choo missed the opportunity to model the new line off of the anime Hand Maid May by putting the USB hub at the back. But now he has an idea for the next line!

Head over to their store to see all the available options for Smart Doll. They are constantly growing and evolving.

Source: Danny Choo/Smart Doll
Feature/insert images: Danny Choo/Smart Doll

Miniature Movie Sets Crafted With Such Detail You Won’t Believe Your Eyes

 by SA Rogers

Before special effects went digital with CGI, part of the magic of movie making included artists laboring over tiny scaled-down sets, creating little worlds that look totally real until a normal-sized human hand appears in the scene. One museum in France lets visitors explore over 100 such sets, each standing out for its incredible realism. At Musée Miniature & Cinéma in Lyon, you can gaze upon these miniatures as well as a collection of over 300 full-scale movie props.

Painstaking attention is paid to textures and weathering in the miniature scenes, like a kitchen with cooking implements smaller than sewing needles, peeling floor tiles and grimy windows. A thick layer of dust covers the floor of a brick-lined underground storage space.

A dimly-lit hair barber shop boasts photos of Elvis on the walls, with stained towels crumpled on the counters. The lighting is half of the magic, often coming in through windows or illuminating only one small section of a scene so the rest remains shadowy and mysterious.

Pick up a magnifying glass and examine the museums 1,000-piece collection of arts and crafts in miniature, including stringed instruments, origami, micro paper art and other tiny delicate creations. Then, move on to the Cinema Collection, which unveils all the tricks that are used by cinema magicians like masks, prop guns and robotic dinosaurs. Walk onto scaled sets that are somewhere between miniatures and full-size, which made train crashes and spaceship scenes a lot easier to film.

The Musée Miniature & Cinéma is owned and curated by Dan Ohlmann, himself a famed miniaturist responsible for many of the scenes that can be found within the museum. You can even go backstage to watch him and other miniature artists work on commissioned pieces and restore artifacts from famous films, like the giant Alien Queen body from the movie Alien vs. Predator.

Visit the full site here: http://www.museeminiatureetcinema.fr/accueil_eng.html

Lashing Out Loud - Replacing those pesky eyelashes the easy way

Laurie Lenz, one of the jaw dropping repaint talents in the group The Repaint Society, has provided us with us awesome tutorial on eyelashes. 

I know that the majority of my ladies get crushed or missing eyelashes at one point or another - the downside to actually playing with my toys. Thankfully, it's not that hard to replace them and here's how:

What you need:

*Eyelashes...preferably a strip without glue on it. (Dollmore, or Volks sell them.)

*Aleene's Quik Dry Tacky Glue
(I recommend the Quik Dry, or you'll be waiting for FOREVER.)
(Never EVER EVER use Crazy Glue! It's from the devil.)

*Angled tweezers

*Angled scissors (that little piece of yarn is there to warn my family--"touch & die.")

*Toothpicks

*Damp Cotton Swab (not pictured.)

 

Hold your eyelash strip up to the doll's eye to get a rough estimate of how much you'll need.

Cut the section off the strip and gently roll your lash around a pencil to give it some curl.

Take the Quik Dry Tacky Glue and apply it to a toothpick.

(This is a water based glue.  If you ever want to remove the lashes, just wet a Qtip and dab on the lashes and they will come off. Never use any glue but a water based glue. )

Dot dot dot the glue from her tear duct to the center of her eye. (Do not go past the center.)

Apply tacky glue to half of the eyelash.

See that Q-tip? I always have a damp one there just in case I get some glue on my doll

so I can quickly wipe it off.

Allow to sit for a few seconds and then with your angled tweezers, place the lash against the eyelid -glue to glue.

With a clean toothpick, gently press the lash into place.

Go make a sandwich, waste time on Facebook, place a bid on a doll, or move your wash to the dryer, and allow the glue to dry.

Once the glue has set, press the eyelash down, so you can judge where it needs to end.

Pull the lash up gently, and cut to fit.

Pull the lash back and run a bead of glue on her upper lid, 

and run a bead of glue on the back of her eyelash.

With the clean toothpick, press down and position.

Allow the spider lady's eyes to dry.

Once they are dry, take your angled scissors and trim the lashes.

From ordinary to extraordinary. Love those lashes, Daphne!
Special thanks to Laurie Lenz for this tutorial. She the original below and check out all her other amazing work - seriously, check it out! 

http://etsylaurielenzangels.blogspot.com/2014/07/lashing-out-eyelash-tutorial.html

Modifying Heads For Hybrid Dolls - An Easy Solution

writer//Amy Namsiriwan

Iplehouse makes really beautiful dolls, but if you're like me and have need specific physiques for specific dolls, then you may want to hybrid their heads onto other bodies. However, Iplehouse dolls have large necks compared to the vast majority of bjds out there so there are very few, if any, bodies out there that that Iplehouse heads fit on without some sort of modification.

This is actually quite easy to do! Of course the method works for other hybridizations where the head hole is bigger than the neck.

You just need some clay, plastic wrap and an xacto knife or some other similar tool for shaping.

First cut 2 pieces of plastic wrap, one to cover the neck stump, one to fit in the head's neck hole:

Then take the clay, ball it up and then mold it into the neck hole:

Now take the head with the clay in it and press it down on the plastic covered neck until the head looks like it's sitting the way you want it to. At this point, the clay will have squished out some and you may need to trim around the edges:

You'll see inside the head, when you pressed the clay, that the hole for the S-hook leaves a shape in the the piece:

That shape serves as a guide to show you where you need to cut the hole for the S-hook. Make sure to leave ample room. Carving the hole too big is generally not an issue, but if you make it too small then you'll have to carve hard clay out if your S-hook doesn't fit:

While cutting the hole out, the piece may have deformed some, so fit the piece in between the head and neck again to make sure that the shape is right. At this point you can smooth it out as much as you wish as well. The only part that will be showing is the lip of the underside of the piece, so it's not really necessary to make it all that pretty, but if you're a real stickler for details, even ones that can't be seen, knock yourself out!

Now you just let the clay dry, or boil or bake the clay, depending on what kind of clay you used. Sand or finish it any way you like if you wish. You can either use the clay piece itself, or if you like, you could get a small kit and cast the piece in resin. The clay seems to work just fine though. You can paint the lip that shows to match the doll's skin if you wish, but I find that mine isn't really seen much in pictures.

Even hardened clay is usually somewhat soft and still carvable with carving tools, so even if you find that your new piece needs some adjusting after it you thought it was finished, it can still be changed. Either carved out, or you could use a hot glue gun to add on, which I like to do since I trust the hot glue as sueding against the resin. Clay seems to hold pretty well against resin, but i still like glue.

The end!

Hope this helps some people!

Sorry for the rough example, but I'm doing this quickly and I'm not actually making a new piece for use since I already have one so I'm not going to take the time to make a fully finished smoothed out piece.

For other tutorials, visit Dirili's homepage: HERE