tutorial

Resin Yellowing - the Hows and Whys and What you can do about it.

If you collect resin dolls, eventually they all start to yellow. Whatever light they are in, whether it is direct sunlight, indirect light, indoor lighting or, hell, just age - they all have an effect on the pigment of the resin and all - sadly - turn various stages of yellow. As the color pigments in resin begin to break down and fade the one color that seemingly doesn't is yellow. Red pigments fade the fastest and every brand, color and type will all react differently and fade at different rates. 

There is no way to avoid yellowing, it is a natural occurrence in the resin BUT there are ways to slow it down

The main way is to avoid sunlight. That doesn't mean you can't take your dolls outside for photoshoots (I'd be completely screwed if I couldn't play outside with my dolls!) Just don't leave them sitting around outside in the sun for hours or days. A small amount of sunlight is not going to immediately damage your dolls. Go play dammit, just do it smart!

Use a UV resistant sealant. There are a number of really great ones on the market, Mr Super Clear is probably the best known but ask around, there are new products out that I'm not familiar with - check with your favorite faceup artist, they will usually know what works best. Sealants can yellow, btw. That is easily fixable with a quick wipe and new faceup but the resin itself won't yellow.

Lots of other ways you can try to slow the yellowing process is to keep them in a room with the curtains drawn, you could dress them in clothing that completely covers them (though some dark clothes stain certain resins...), keep them all hidden away from everything and everyone in sealed boxes where nobody will ever see them (really, whats the point of having them then if you can't enjoy them?)

Oh - and keep them away from cigarette smoke. Just like your teeth, resin will absorb it and turn yellow too.

Look, yellowing is natural and inevitable - that doesn't mean you shouldn't enjoy your dolls. They are meant to be played with, customized, looked at, photographed and redressed. THAT is why you got into bjds to begin with, right?

Okay - SO - you have a doll that is yellowing what can you do?

WELL - funny you should ask. There are a few different options.

The sure fire way - you can sand off the yellowed resin with a high grit paper to remove the top layer and expose the original color.

The other way - paint it or dye it.  Read how to below.

(Note - the post below is copied from Den Of Angles. I have tried to locate the original author to ask permission to share this but have been unsuccessful. I think it's really valuable information and encourage you all to please visit the original post to read about others results and modifications. There is some really fantastic advice from a number of members and lots of comparison pics too.)

Author - Cymorill (DoA)
 

De-zombification Serum: Resin Color Restoration

I've posted a few experimental restoration threads in the past for mildly yellowed and mellowed resin, but I've finally perfected it in an easy-to-use method! This works for both sanded and unsanded parts! Please be aware that each part must be either unsanded (like hands and feet) or completely sanded if the seam lines have been removed to give an even tone! This method uses a special mixture of RIT dye to restore the red tones to resin that has faded and taken on that "zombie" hue.

Supplies:
1 bottle each of liquid (not powder) RIT dye according to the below formula
1 small glass bottle
1 eyedropper (or bottle with eyedropper top)
Water
Pan
Stove

To make "De-Zombification Serum" :
(Since the colors supplied by your local craft or fabric store can vary, I'll list a few different serum formulas)
Formula #1: Mix 1 part Scarlet Red, 2 parts Golden Yellow, and 3 parts Petal Pink in the small glass bottle. Close and shake until blended.
Formula #2: Mix 4 parts Rose Pink, 1 part Tan.

*Note: But my doll is already yellow! Why add yellow or tan dye? Because straight out red dye makes a doll look sunburned. The yellow tones in the resin also break down, but not to the extent that the red does and not as quickly. This mixture provides a flesh color, not that freshly-spanked-bottom blush.
**Another note: Interestingly, this serum looks like fresh blood. 

To use "De-Zombification Serum" :
** Make certain all doll parts are clean and free of MSC, blush and paint **
1. Measure out enough water to cover your doll parts and pour it into the pan.
2. Heat water to just under a boil (when it starts to get bubbles on the bottom but is not actively boiling)
3. Using the eyedropper, add 3 drops serum for every 1 cup of water and stir well.
4. Begin with a test piece. This should be an arm or leg piece, something smooth and easy to sand if it's left in the dye bath too long.
5. Submerge test piece in dye bath. Remove after 30 second and rinse thoroughly to check color. If the color is still too light, repeat until desired flesh tone is achieved. This will be your total soaking time! Soaking times will vary for each doll due to resin type and degree of yellowing. The time does not vary for sanded vs. unsanded parts of the same doll.
6. Submerge remaining doll parts in the bath, allowing them to soak for the established soaking time, stirring occasionally.
7. Remove pieces and rinse thoroughly in running water. Dry, and allow to cool.
8. If the color on a single piece is too dark or uneven (due to poor sanding) wipe the part with nailpolish remover and a cotton ball while the part is still warm. This will remove a little of the dye.
9. If your doll is too large or your pan is too small to soak all the parts at once, that's okay. BUT you must make a new bath for each batch of parts, as subsiquent batches will be lighter as the dye is used up. Dye time will be the same for each batch of the same doll.

That's it! This same method can also be used to color match hybrid parts.
The De-Zombification Serum can be saved and used again later. As with any dye project, be certain to observe the usual precautions. Careful not to get any of the serum on your hands or you might transfer it to you resinoyd and stain it.

Example: To restore a very faded Luts Kid Delf, I soak the parts for 1 1/2 minutes. To color match a very faded Kid Delf to a Minifee head, I soaked the body for 4 1/2 minutes.

Some comparison pictures
Non-sanded parts:

Sanded parts:

Do you have any tips or a solution that works for you - be sure to share it below so that others can benefit from your experiences. I'm still fairly new to all of this so I'm genuinely interested in learning! 

EXCLUSIVE Tutorial by UNNIEdolls

UNNIEdolls gives us the first look at her newest tutorial. An adorable off shoulder blouse with easy to follow directions. ENJOY!

I created this pattern maybe a year ago. Many of you have been interested how I make the off shoulder blouses for my dolls. So, here is a tutorial, where I show you the whole process. If you make a blouse by using my pattern, please share with me on facebook, instagram, flickr, deviantart by using this hashtag #sewingwithunnie

HUNGARIAN SUBTITLE is available!

if you have any questions, please ask!:)

♥ Webpage/blog/shop: http://unniedolls.com
♥ Etsy Shop: http://unniedolls.etsy.com

My social sites:
♥ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/unniedolls
♥ Google+: https://plus.google.com/+unniedolls1
♥ VK: http://vk.com/unniedolls

♥ Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/UNNiEDOLLS
♥ Tumblr: http://unniedolls.tumblr.com
 

Lashing Out Loud - Replacing those pesky eyelashes the easy way

Laurie Lenz, one of the jaw dropping repaint talents in the group The Repaint Society, has provided us with us awesome tutorial on eyelashes. 

I know that the majority of my ladies get crushed or missing eyelashes at one point or another - the downside to actually playing with my toys. Thankfully, it's not that hard to replace them and here's how:

What you need:

*Eyelashes...preferably a strip without glue on it. (Dollmore, or Volks sell them.)

*Aleene's Quik Dry Tacky Glue
(I recommend the Quik Dry, or you'll be waiting for FOREVER.)
(Never EVER EVER use Crazy Glue! It's from the devil.)

*Angled tweezers

*Angled scissors (that little piece of yarn is there to warn my family--"touch & die.")

*Toothpicks

*Damp Cotton Swab (not pictured.)

 

Hold your eyelash strip up to the doll's eye to get a rough estimate of how much you'll need.

Cut the section off the strip and gently roll your lash around a pencil to give it some curl.

Take the Quik Dry Tacky Glue and apply it to a toothpick.

(This is a water based glue.  If you ever want to remove the lashes, just wet a Qtip and dab on the lashes and they will come off. Never use any glue but a water based glue. )

Dot dot dot the glue from her tear duct to the center of her eye. (Do not go past the center.)

Apply tacky glue to half of the eyelash.

See that Q-tip? I always have a damp one there just in case I get some glue on my doll

so I can quickly wipe it off.

Allow to sit for a few seconds and then with your angled tweezers, place the lash against the eyelid -glue to glue.

With a clean toothpick, gently press the lash into place.

Go make a sandwich, waste time on Facebook, place a bid on a doll, or move your wash to the dryer, and allow the glue to dry.

Once the glue has set, press the eyelash down, so you can judge where it needs to end.

Pull the lash up gently, and cut to fit.

Pull the lash back and run a bead of glue on her upper lid, 

and run a bead of glue on the back of her eyelash.

With the clean toothpick, press down and position.

Allow the spider lady's eyes to dry.

Once they are dry, take your angled scissors and trim the lashes.

From ordinary to extraordinary. Love those lashes, Daphne!
Special thanks to Laurie Lenz for this tutorial. She the original below and check out all her other amazing work - seriously, check it out! 

http://etsylaurielenzangels.blogspot.com/2014/07/lashing-out-eyelash-tutorial.html

Modifying Heads For Hybrid Dolls - An Easy Solution

writer//Amy Namsiriwan

Iplehouse makes really beautiful dolls, but if you're like me and have need specific physiques for specific dolls, then you may want to hybrid their heads onto other bodies. However, Iplehouse dolls have large necks compared to the vast majority of bjds out there so there are very few, if any, bodies out there that that Iplehouse heads fit on without some sort of modification.

This is actually quite easy to do! Of course the method works for other hybridizations where the head hole is bigger than the neck.

You just need some clay, plastic wrap and an xacto knife or some other similar tool for shaping.

First cut 2 pieces of plastic wrap, one to cover the neck stump, one to fit in the head's neck hole:

Then take the clay, ball it up and then mold it into the neck hole:

Now take the head with the clay in it and press it down on the plastic covered neck until the head looks like it's sitting the way you want it to. At this point, the clay will have squished out some and you may need to trim around the edges:

You'll see inside the head, when you pressed the clay, that the hole for the S-hook leaves a shape in the the piece:

That shape serves as a guide to show you where you need to cut the hole for the S-hook. Make sure to leave ample room. Carving the hole too big is generally not an issue, but if you make it too small then you'll have to carve hard clay out if your S-hook doesn't fit:

While cutting the hole out, the piece may have deformed some, so fit the piece in between the head and neck again to make sure that the shape is right. At this point you can smooth it out as much as you wish as well. The only part that will be showing is the lip of the underside of the piece, so it's not really necessary to make it all that pretty, but if you're a real stickler for details, even ones that can't be seen, knock yourself out!

Now you just let the clay dry, or boil or bake the clay, depending on what kind of clay you used. Sand or finish it any way you like if you wish. You can either use the clay piece itself, or if you like, you could get a small kit and cast the piece in resin. The clay seems to work just fine though. You can paint the lip that shows to match the doll's skin if you wish, but I find that mine isn't really seen much in pictures.

Even hardened clay is usually somewhat soft and still carvable with carving tools, so even if you find that your new piece needs some adjusting after it you thought it was finished, it can still be changed. Either carved out, or you could use a hot glue gun to add on, which I like to do since I trust the hot glue as sueding against the resin. Clay seems to hold pretty well against resin, but i still like glue.

The end!

Hope this helps some people!

Sorry for the rough example, but I'm doing this quickly and I'm not actually making a new piece for use since I already have one so I'm not going to take the time to make a fully finished smoothed out piece.

For other tutorials, visit Dirili's homepage: HERE 

Turn your boring pieces of furniture into vintage shabby chic awesome

I simply adore anything that has character, so when I saw this tutorial by Unniedolls I knew I had to share it! 

Not only is it super easy but it looks fantastic. Think of all those bare wood items at Michaels that you could spruce up - oh, and don't forget to download their app too to save extra $$$ ;)

Be sure to check out Unniedolls here:
♥ Webpage/blog: http://unniedolls.com
♥ Etsy Shop: http://unniedolls.etsy.com

Making a custom wig - Not as hard as I imagined

I found this fantastic tutorial today and was mesmerized watching her. I'm sharing part 2 which is about placing the hair on the wig, I think making the cap is probably fairly simple and I'll leave it to you to go to her site and watch that one.  I really just wanted you all to see that it isn't as hard as you might think to make your own.

Of course, I probably never will as I'd prefer to pay someone else to do it, lol...BUT if I got crafty (though my crafting skills are really limited) I actually think I could pull this off. So who knows, maybe I'll get industrious one day and give it a shot ;)

Give this a watch and check out Unniedolls website for more. She does some fantastic mods and repaints.

Restringing tutorial - bjd or fashion bjd, it must be done occasionally - here's how

Icarus Love Melody does a fantastic job of showing us how to restring. Many of us have dolls that get kicky (too tight) or floppy and lazy (too loose) - and Lord knows, I'm the only lazy bitch allowed around here!  

This looks way more simple that I thought it was. Maybe a few of my dolls will get tightened up a bit now.  

Hmm, can someone please come pull my strings and tighten me back up too? ;)

Restringing is always a daunting task in the beginning, I had friends walk me through it when my first doll required some upkeep and now I hope I can help you~ This is a quick and simple run down of how to restring a BJD; some dolls have different internal structures so this system won't work for everyone but will give at least the basics for those who want to give it a try.

Matchbook nightstand

I stumbled upon this one and thought it was a fantastic idea and fairly simple to follow along.  I was finally able to trace it back to the original poster, who does some fantastic crafts, so be sure to check her out. (I'm also completely jealous of her nails, though I wouldn't be able to function - they are beautiful)